A design competition in collaboration with Hardware Academy is aimed at getting Intel Edison’s adoption up to speed.

Image courtesy of Intel.

 

Intel is joining hands with Hardware Academy to launch a design competition titled the “Intel Edison Developer Challenge” for creating innovative Internet of Things (IoT) prototype solutions in areas such as smart home, factory automation, and connected cars.

The winning prototype will be awarded a cash prize of £1,000 (almost $1300 USD) and 3D printing services coupon worth £500 from 3D Hubs. Moreover, the top 10 product proposals will receive a free Edison kit and eight weeks to build a functioning prototype.

Intel Edison is the new kid on the embedded design block, and it offers significantly higher performance compared to other prototype development platforms like Arduino and Raspberry Pi 2. For instance, take Arduino, which runs at 16 MHz without built-in communications interfaces and ample storage capacity.

 

Intel Edison hardware comes in a much smaller footprint and offers a lot more compute power. Image courtesy of Intel.

 

On the other hand, Edison runs at 500 MHz dual core and comes with 40 general-purpose I/O (GPIO) pins for boards, buttons, sensors, LEDs, and more. Then, there is 1GB of RAM, 4GB of eMMC flash storage and a USB 2.0 OTG controller. Moreover, Edison modules come with built-in Wi-Fi and Bluetooth connectivity.

Another prominent highlight of the Edison module is that despite a significant increase in computing power, a broad spectrum of I/Os, and software support for embedded Linux distribution, it’s still low-power. The Edison board can operate on voltages between 3.15V to 4.5V, which means that it can be powered by a standard Lithium battery.

 

Arduino: Friend or Foe?

It’s worth noting that Intel’s Edison platform supports the Arduino IDE; the “Arduino board for Edison” enables designers to make the Edison board compatible with shields designed for Arduino. Outfits like SparkFun Electronics offer open-source Edison boards along with design files that can be downloaded from the company website.

The development platforms like Arduino and Raspberry Pi 2 are already well entrenched among embedded designers, hobbyists, and electronics entrepreneurs. On the other hand, Intel’s Edison, being launched in January 2014, is trying the speed up the adoption curve while the IoT party is just getting started.

 

The design competition is aimed at creating innovative IoT prototypes. Image courtesy of Hardware Academy.

 

The prototypes for the embryonic IoT products offer Intel a window of opportunity to get the Edison platform up to speed. And the competition Intel Edison Developer Challenge in collaboration with the London–based Hardware Academy is clearly part of that effort. Intel is promoting Edison as a prototyping platform for IoT applications.

Hardware Academy aims to allow IoT developers get hands-on with the latest development tools and facilitate the technical support that IoT technology suppliers like Intel offer. It has conducted training sessions for developers about IoT development platforms such as Intel Edison, Samsung Artik, and Nordic nRF52 chipsets for Bluetooth low energy.

IoT developers can submit proposals about their IoT prototypes on the competition page before August 31, 2016.

 

Comments

4 Comments


  • baylf2000 2016-08-16

    This “article” reads a hell of a lot like an intel advertisement than genuine news. You completely fail to mention any of the negatives of the Edison platform, primarily the MASSIVE cost differences between Arduino and Edison. The module itself is totally useless without some kind of carrier board, and altogether costs around three times that of a basic arduino board.

    You also claim that the Edison “offers significantly higher performance compared to other prototype development platforms like Arduino and Raspberry Pi 2”. How do you justify this claim? Why are you comparing it to an older version of the Pi? Pi 3 (which is half the price) offers a quad core 64 bit CPU running at 1.2Ghz vs the Edison’s dual core 500Mhz 32-bit Atom cpu.

    Most importantly, the Edison has nothing like the community support of either the Arduino or the Pi, and most hardware drivers on the Arduino platform will fail to work on the Edison.

    So given your exclusions I can only assume this was a paid advertising piece and should be marked as such.

    • Majeed Ahmad 2016-08-16

      The article was about informing engineers about a design competition that is based on Intel Edison hardware. So it introduced / profiled Intel Edison a bit (comparison with Arduino and Pi was not in the scope of the article).

      Here I am quoting the second para of the second part of the article:

      “The development platforms like Arduino and Raspberry Pi 2 are already well entrenched among embedded designers, hobbyists, and electronics entrepreneurs. On the other hand, Intel’s Edison, being launched in January 2014, is trying the speed up the adoption curve while the IoT party is just getting started.”

      It clearly states that Edison is a new player while Arduino and Pi are entrenched. Intel is a big company with a lot marketing dollars. But that doesn’t mean that every article about Intel is ‘sponsored.’ Or to make it look like ‘independent,’ it has to make fun of Intel’s technology or products.

      • baylf2000 2016-08-19

        You say in your comment above that “comparison with Arduino and Pi was not in the scope of the article”. What are you talking about?? The actual TITLE of your article is “Edison vs. Arduino: Intel Battles for the IoT”. In the article you wrote “Intel Edison is the new kid on the embedded design block, and it offers significantly higher performance compared to other prototype development platforms like Arduino and Raspberry Pi 2.”. Those are the very definition of comparisons. You make a statement claiming superiority of the Edison platform which is not only grossly incorrect by almost any measure, but also misleading. And once you have begun the comparison game, you then completely fail to mention even a single one of the very many negative aspects of the Edison platform.

        So my point stands. Either you’re a very poor quality writer, or you’re being paid by Intel or others with interests in the Edison platform.

  • Joe_M 2016-08-26

    I agree with baylf2000 , who paid you to write this article, it was not accurate, and only looked like an attempt to push Intel’s product into the limelight. Arduino has come along the way.  it did so because no company saw the Arduino growing until it was already massive. I’m guessing that Intel didn’t understand who the target audience is, or they would not have made the Edison so darn expensive to work with. Many of the people who work with Arduino do not have money to burn, many are students with limited funds. Arduino is so easy to get, and so easy to work with that it will almost be impossible to stop it by making something better. It would have to be cheaper, and better in all ways to unseat Arduino. Even if an Arduino were not good enough, the second choice would not be Edison. Most people who do this would ask the Arduino community for advice, and from that advice, Edison would never be mentioned.