3D gesture recognition development just became a lot more accessible.

Microchip Technology recently unveiled their DV102014 development kit; a 2D and 3D gesture recognition development kit and display module, all on the same platform with a user interface. The kit sells for $249, and will allow people to develop applications without having to code. The device can detect gestures from up to 20 cm away from its surface, as well as gestures made on the display's surface.

The 2D and 3D gesture data is collected by sensors and displayed on the interface, Colibri Suite on 2D, 3D, or 2D & 3D position grids. The 2D sensory data is collected by an 8-inch ITO capacitive sensor and 3D data is collected by electric field proximity sensing. Andreas Guete, the marketing manager of Microchip's Human Machine Interface Division gives a demonstration in the video below. 


The kit itself comes with the 8-inch ITO sensor, a 3D electrode PCB, an electronics controller for 2D and 3D, an 8-inch PCAP touch screen; and of course, a micro USB-cable. The development kit combines some of Microchip's previous inventions, including an MTCH6303 capacitive touch controller, an MGC3130 3D Gestic controller; and an MTCH652 boost converter. You can find the full specifications and schematics in the DV102014's User's Guide (PDF).


Diagram from the DV102014's User's Guide


Having the ability to do simple tasks like swiping at a distance will allow for safer app use in automobiles by eliminating the need to look down from the road when answering or dismissing phone calls. Other possibilities, while maybe less practical, are numerous, and could make the futuristic interfaces we see in sci-fi movies a reality. We're really hoping for those 3D holographic keyboards that Tony Stark has. If in the future, Microchip's can be integrated with other motion sensor technology, those interfaces may be closer than you'd think.

The DV102014 has the potential for the development of a variety of applications. Microchip's "out of the box" approach to this kit should open the world of 3D gesture recognition to a wider array of users than ever before. User-friendly interfaces have been making the development of complex technology easier and more accessible for decades now. Like the invention of WYSIWYG interfaces for operating systems and web development platforms, the DV102014 might open the door for some amazing new programs. We're already geeking out at the possibilities. If you've already got your hands on a DV102014, let us know what you think of it in the comments.

Source: Microchip.com