This New Product Brief (NPB) is part of a video series highlighting the features, applications, and technical specs of newly-released products.

TE Connectivity FX29 Compression Load Cells

TE Connectivity FX29 Compression Load Cells are designed for medical and industrial applications requiring a compact, robust, and flexible force sensor.

Sensors are available with standard load ranges from 50 newton to 500 newton and have high over range capabilities. The FX29 series is based on a rugged Microfused sensing element that provides excellent stability, cycle life, resolution, and sensitivity.

The sensors offer designers the flexibility of millivolt, amplified, and I2C digital output options, with integrated diagnostics in the amplified and digital output sensors. The sensors operate from a 5.25 to 6 volt supply and have low power consumption, with all variants rated for an operating current of 3 milliamps, and the digital version offering a 0.5 microamp sleep mode.

FX29 series sensors are housed in a compact stainless steel enclosure for mechanical ruggedness and compatibility with a wide range of media.

  • Standard load range: 50N to 500N (10lbf to 100lbf)
    • 2.5x over-range capability
  • Rugged Microfused Sensing Element
  • mV, amplified, and digital (I2C) output options
    • Integrated sensor diagnostics (amplified and digital output only)
  • Low power consumption
    • 5.25V to 6V supply
    • 3mA rated current
    • 5µA sleep current (digital only)
  • Stainless steel enclosure
    • 19.7mm diameter
    • 5.45mm overall height

More Information

 


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